Picture shows the backs of a teenage boy and his younger sister walking down a path in autumn.
homeschooling

Switching to Correspondence Courses for Highschool Credit

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We’re taken another step in our homeschool journey. I’ve spent a huge part of this past week going through and trying to ensure that my teenager gets credit for grade nine, even though were homeschooling, so that he can do grade ten correspondence courses this year. (Yes, yes, I know I should have done this months ago, but I didn’t know about this particular source of correspondence courses or what the requirements would be.)

Anyway, it is a very interesting task. I go through the Ontario curriculum requirements for the courses that I believe he has completed and for each item in the requirements I have to describe how he completed it. Occasionally I find items he hasn’t done, and I assign him extra tasks. He’s done a variety of odd assignments this week, writing notes on different topics, watching specific videos, discussing odd topics.

Sometimes I sit staring at a requirement thinking, “ok, we covered that language arts topic, but we covered that topic while we exploring how a particular computer game was using pseudo-Assyrian” or “he covered that science topic when he was writing up tech trees for computer game mods he was making. I remember that. He came and explained to me all about it.” I wonder what the reviewer will make of the descriptions. Will it sound too much like I’m stretching things? Will she object to most topics being covered in discussion and not in writing assignments? Will she say “just reading books about it doesn’t count?” Oh, I hope she doesn’t make me assign grades to every single topic.

Homeschooling has been a lifestyle for us. We read. We talk. We do projects. We argue. We read more. I think about all the things he learned this past year that don’t fit anywhere in the curriculum. Even while I worry I didn’t get him to do enough of the “right” stuff, I try to remind myself he did quite a bit of other learning too.

He is starting on some of the correspondence courses that don’t have prerequisites, and I’m confident he can do them, but I’m also not sure how much he’ll be learning from them. Does it make sense for him to do three years of these in order to get a highschool diploma? I’m not entirely sure.
This is yet another adventure on our homeschooling journey. Wish us luck!

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